The Kindelization of Tablets, Part 2: The Silk Strategy

[Is Amazon’s Silk an elaborate attempt at avoiding privacy concerns? VisionMobile Product Manager, Stijn Schuermans, examines Amazon’s strategy and argues the reasoning behind a Kindle smartphone and the likely plans for licensing Silk]

The second in a series of articles where we expose the innovation frameworks behind Mobile Innovation Economics, this issue highlights the trend of of the Kindelization of tablets: specifically, Amazon’s Silk browser. As in our previous article, we believe that our analysis still holds true almost a year after its original release in December 2011.

The Kindle Fire and Silk are important developments that hint to the future of online retailing. The Kindle introduces new techniques to drive foot traffic into Amazon’s retail properties by subsidizing devices, rather than paying for search advertising. In turn, Silk is used to generate deep customer insight and expand shelf space. We expect Amazon to extend the Silk shelf space by licensing this browser to other tablet and smartphone makers, turning handset makers into Amazon Associates.

You can also download the full, 5-page report in pdf format here.

Continue reading The Kindelization of Tablets, Part 2: The Silk Strategy

From Mobile to TV: The companion screens opportunity and the role of apps

[The latest trend in app development is targeting companion screens, as a way to bridge a multi-screen experience. Guest author Peggy Allbright investigates the future of app development on companion screens -and TV apps in particular – and discusses how TV advertising has found a whole new screen to engage users on.]

The Future of TV Apps

TV applications are opening up a new business frontier for the mobile industry. But we are still in the most nascent phases of the TV app industry’s formation and it needs to evolve on many fronts. Fortunately, early startup activities are revealing some of the roles that devices, apps, developers, merchandising and advertising can play in this industry, as we’ll see in this article.

The industry is well aware that consumers want to be engaged with their devices while watching TV and that many consumers are beginning to use mobile devices and apps as interactive “companions” to supplement the TV viewing experience.  New research released by Google in August provides some of the latest data to characterize this trend. Google found that in a typical day, 77% of television viewers use a second device, such as a tablet, smartphone or PC, while watching TV. More than one-fifth (22%) of these consumers are using the TV and their second device in ways that complement each other, even if it is only a simple search related to the live TV programming.

Continue reading From Mobile to TV: The companion screens opportunity and the role of apps

The Kindelization of Tablets – Part 1

[Did you think that the Kindle Fire and the iPad are in direct competition? Think again! VisionMobile Product Manager, Stijn Schuermans, disseminates the tablet market and explains why the iPad and Kindle Fire are augmented product offerings, as well as what differentiates them from other tablets and from each other]

This is the first in a series of blog articles where we expose the strategic thinking behind Mobile Innovation Economics. This first issue is a retrospective of the Kindelization of tablets, first released as a report in October 2011, but with predictions that still hold true almost a year later. Back then, we wrote that the iPad (Apple) and the Kindle Fire (Amazon) are augmented product offerings, which differentiates them from other tablets and from each other. They are not in direct competition with each other as they support different use cases and operate on opposite business model polarities. Other Android tablets will continue to struggle as long as they are not use-case differentiated. Almost one year later, our predictions still stand true. You can also download the full, 5-page report in pdf format here.

 

The story

Amazon announced the Amazon Kindle Fire tablet device on September 28, 2011. Like the iPad, the Kindle Fire is part of a larger content retail and service offering. Continue reading The Kindelization of Tablets – Part 1

WebRTC: a new game-changer, disrupting Telcos and OTTs

[Championed by Google, WebRTC allows browsers to make calls from your PC or phone – and it’s disupting both telcos and incumbent VoIP players, from Skype to Viber. Guest author Tsahi Levent-Levi discusses Google’s intentions and the trouble ahead for both telcos and OTT players.]

It’s been a tough couple of years for carriers (a.k.a. network operators) who have been fighting off competition from over-the-top (OTT) players such as Skype and WhatsApp, offering services such as voice and SMS over the carriers’ own networks. The impact of these OTT players has been astonishing – whether they’re nimble startups like Viber (with more than 90 million users, making over 1.5 billion calls a month and sending over 2 billion text messages), or large corporations such as Apple, whose iMessage  reaches 140 million users, sending 1 billion iMessages every day. Continue reading WebRTC: a new game-changer, disrupting Telcos and OTTs