Smart < feature phones = the unbalanced equation (100 Million Club series)

[Smartphones get all the media attention, but it’s feature phones that are still driving the mobile industry. Marketing Manager Matos Kapetanakis examines this unbalanced equation and makes sense of the numbers published in the latest 100 Million Club]

100 Million Club - Smart < feature phones: the unbalanced equation

Welcome back to the 100 Million Club. This 6th edition of our watchlist tracking successful mobile software companies debunks the smartphone myth and paints a detailed picture behind the 34 software products – from BREW to Webkit  – which have shipped in more than 100 million handsets as of the end of H1 2010. Click here to download the watchlist.

Key insights
– Despite the hype, smartphone platforms account for less than 20 percent of the 620+ million handsets shipped globally in Q1 and Q2 of 2010. More than 80 percent of total shipments are driven by feature phones, the majority of which use proprietary software platforms.

– BlackBerry is now the second smartphone platform, after Symbian, to break the 100M handset barrier. As of the end of June 2010, RIM has sold more than 100 million BlackBerry devices.

– A total of 350M handsets have shipped with a WebKit-powered mobile browser up to the end of 2Q10. The biggest contributors to shipments of the open source browser engine are the Series 40 and Symbian OSs, while the steep rise of Android will play a bigger role in WebKit going forward.

– Only a handful of mobile software products were shipped in more than 100 million devices during the first half of 2010. Among them are the T9/XT9 text input engines by Nuance, the vRapid Mobile software update engine by Red Bend and the Nucleus real-time OS by Mentor Graphics.

– Symbian alone has more shipments in H1 2010 than iOS and Android combined. Moreover, when combined, the Google and Apple mobile operating systems make up less than 20% of Series 40 shipments in Q1 and Q2 2010.

What’s new in the Club?
In this 6th edition of the 100 Million Club we ‘ve introduced a dedicated watchlist tracking mobile platform shipments.

The watchlist comprises of 10 application environment software products, OSs and RTOSs with more than 100 million installations. Our latest members in these categories are the BlackBerry OS by Research in Motion and ThreadX by Express Logic. We have also added media favourites Android, iOS and Windows Phone 7, for comparative purposes, since they are well below the 100 million mark.

The Embedded Software Shipments watchlist features 24 products that have been pre-installed in more than 100 million handsets. This latestedition of the club sees the addition of the Media EXP, an audio/video codec and frameworks suite by Aricent and MSIP, a mobile analytics software agent, by Carrier IQ.

100 Million Club - 1H10 - Mobile Platform Shipments
Click on the image to download the full pdf

The smart vs. ‘dumb’ phone equation
The impact of smartphones to the industry is way overrated. It’s a little-told secret that smartphones account for only 20% of worldwide handset shipments, a fact we tend to forget in the face of the one-sided media storm that surrounds smartphones. A key observation from the 100 Million Club is that the ‘proprietary’ Nokia’s Series 40 and Qualcomm BREW are shipped in many times more handsets than Android, iOS, BlackBerry even the older Windows Mobile and Symbian OSs. In fact, with 638 million cumulative shipments by the end of Q2 2010, BREW is the most widely deployed licensable mobile operating system. If one considers real-time OSes for application and baseband processors, then the shipments scale to the billions of phones.

OS, RTOS shipments H1 2010
Click on the image to download the full watchlist

So, is Nokia’s Series 40 the most successful OS ever? Not exactly; the handset market is very much dependent on internal OEM platforms, which power more than 45% of total handset shipments for H1 2010. Samsung and LG, ranking 2nd and 3rd in the top-five handset OEM leaderboard, are largely responsible for proprietary platform shipments. Samsung has heavily ramped up smartphone shipments starting in Q2 2010 (which should become visible in H2 results) and is investing in its home-grown Bada platform, a C++ layer on top of its proprietary SHP operating system. LG also hopes to get a larger piece of the smartphone pie, by releasing 20 new smartphone models in 2H10.

The 20% share of smartphone shipments is set to grow rapidly driven by two phenomena; firstly the growth of Internet-borne platforms, namely iOS and Android. Secondly, the carrier drive to commission and subsidise smartphone handsets as a differentiating strategy, which is driving the carrier-happy tier-1 OEMs (Motorola, Sony Ericsson, Samsung and LG) to bend over backwards and ramp-up smartphone production. This is unprecedented growth in share of smartphone sales, which was neighbouring at 10 percent back in 2007.

The shift of attention of traditional handset OEMs towards smartphones, coupled with the rise of smartphone-only vendors, seems to indicate a balance shift in the smartphone vs. feature phone balance. It might seem a foregone conclusion that that pretty soon we’ll have a majority of smartphones flooding the global market. However, that is not going to happen overnight, i.e. not in the next 3-4 years. Smartphone shipments of traditional OEMs are but a fraction of their overall shipments, while Apple, RIM, HTC and ZTE cannot yet hope to meet the demand of huge, feature phone-dependant, price-sensitive markets, like India and China.

Clash of the platform titans
In the clash between the more familiar platforms, Symbian and BlackBerry rule over newcomers Android and iPhone’s iOS, in terms of cumulative shipments. But the picture is quite different in terms of growth, where Android has been the clear winner, growing by leaps and bounds (from 100K activations a day in May 2010, to 160K a month later and 200K in August – activations are not the same as sales, but the growth is still impressive). RIM and Apple have seen a healthy increase in their handset sales, while Symbian has suffered a small (~3-4%) decrease in market share between H2 2009 and H1 2010, despite Nokia’s growth in the handset market. However, Symbian’s market share is bound to drop even more, considering the recent decision by Samsung and Sony Ericsson to drop Symbian altogether, as well as Nokia’s choice of MeeGo over Symbian^3 for their latest N-series. Symbian is fast becoming a Nokia-only OS so we should expect the end of the line for the Symbian Foundation within the next few months as well.

Where are MeeGo, Chrome OS and webOS in this picture? The short answer is that they are nowhere to be found in mobile devices in the first half of 2010. MeeGo is rumoured to be appearing in Q2 2010 in the market, with Nokia targeting to make first impressions last while facing delays in Qt integration and the departure of key personnel. Chrome OS will most likely be shipped solely in tablets and netbooks, while HP aims at delivering new webOS devices in early 2011.

Last but certainly not least, we should not ignore Microsoft’s latest bid for dominance in the mobile industry: Windows Phone 7. The newly released OS has been completely redesigned to offer iPhone-style margins with an Android-style business model, while targeting untapped pockets of Xbox and PC developers instead of making up with Windows Mobile developers who were left with a bitter aftertaste (see our Developer Economics research). Windows Phone 7 already seems to be building momentum, with 9 new models coming to the market in Q4, $500 million in marketing budgets and a tightly integrated hardware and software platform (see our earlier article on Windows Phone for a detailed strategic analysis).

Not museum material…yet
In summary, smartphones captivate our minds, but it’s still ‘dumb’ phones that we carry around with us. Someday in the foreseeable future, non-touch screen phones will take their place in a telecoms museum (right next to the old, ‘brick’ mobile phones), but that day is not as close as mainstream media have us think.

– Matos

Breaking the 500 million barrier of mobile software

[Which are the most ubiquitous mobile software products out there? Marketing Manager Matos Kapetanakis opens up our 5th edition of the 100 Million Club, the watchlist of embedded software products and talks about the really big numbers of mobile software.]

Welcome to the H2 2009 edition of the 100 Million Club, the semi-annual watchlist of mobile software products that have been embedded in more than 100 million mobile devices since their release. Despite the apparent opportunity in the one-billion-a-year handset market, very few software companies have managed to overcome the commercial and technical challenges inherent in the mobile industry.

Key highlights in this H2 2009 edition:

– “The cumulative number of shipments of all the 100 Million Club software products up to the end of 2009 is 24.6 billion – an 11% increase since the previous half”

– “The estimated 250 million cumulative shipments for Apple’s WebKit show that it is fast becoming a de facto browser platform.”

– “BlackBerry is the next smartphone platform, after Symbian, that will break through the 100 million shipments barrier.”

What’s new in H2 2009?
So, what major changes have we seen since our previous update?

First off we’re happy to welcome three new entrants to the Club: ARM, Mimer and Numonyx have joined, adding three new middleware products to our watchlist. Mimer has just broken the 100 million barrier with its SQL database engine, while ARM brings us Mali-JSR184, a 3D graphics engine for wireless devices. The Flash Data Integrator by Numonyx is already ahead of the game, having been shipped in more than 900 million devices.

We have also had to remove three software products that have long been part of the Club. For different reasons, Mobile BAE by Beatnik and Picsel’s File Viewer are no longer part of the 100 Million Club, while Nokia’s Series 60 OS has been incorporated in the Symbian OS.

(click to download)

Growth in the 100 Million Club
The H2 2009 edition of the 100 Million Club is comprised of 30 software products by 26 companies. The total number of shipments of all 30 products, up to the end of 2009, comes to 24.6 billion – an 11% increase since the previous half.

In the previous edition, the Club featured 15 software products that exceeded 500 million shipments, 6 of which had also broken through the 1 billion barrier. The H2 2009 edition features 17 products with more than 500 million sales, 7 of which have surpassed 1 billion shipments. In other words, for the first time the majority of the products featured in the 100 Million Club have over 500 million shipments.

In the second half of 2009, CAPS by Scalado and OKL4 by Open Kernel Labs managed to break through the 500 million barrier, while Myriad Group’s messaging client and Nokia’s Series 40 OS now have more than 1 billion shipments each.

Category leaders: apps, browsers, middleware and operating systems
Quickoffice wins by default in the embedded applications category, since it’s the only embedded application featured in the 100 Million Club.

Adobe is still number one in the application environments category, with Flash/Flash Lite having been embedded in more than 1.3 billion devices up to the end of 2009. The growth of Flash Lite has decelerated significantly from 43% (1H09) to 15% (2H09) as share of devices sold with the software embedded; however the pace should be picking up pace again with Flash shipments later in 2010.

Myriad Group, whose browser has almost twice as many shipments as the other category products combined, dominates the browser market.

In the middleware category things are not that clear, due to the diversity of products. In absolute numbers, the messaging client by Myriad Group has the most shipments (1.2B) and vRapid Mobile by Red Bend shows the highest of growth over the second half of 2009. UI software is also highly penetrated within mobile devices, led by graphics engines by Ikivo, Scalado and The Astonishing Tribe which are at or around the 500 million mark.

The operating system market features 6 products that have been embedded in more than 1 billion devices. It’s worth noting that mass-appeal operating systems like OSE, Nucleus and recently Series 40 have cumulative shipments numbering in the billions, while BREW has just broken past the 500 million mark. In contrast, most major smartphone platforms – Android, OSX, Windows Mobile, BlackBerry – apart from Symbian have yet to reach 100 million shipments.

Finally, the input engines category features two products, both by Nuance inherited from the past acquisitions of Tegic and Zi Corp. As is evident in the chart, T9/XT9 is by far the most prominent, having been embedded in a staggering 4.8 billion mobile devices up to the end of the second half of 2009.

100 Million Club facts and trends

Two companies account for 38% of shipments: Only two companies have multiple software products included in the 100 Million Club, each company featuring three products. The cumulative number of shipments of these two companies is 9.5 billion, representing 38% of all 100 Million Club products’ shipments up to the end of H2 2009. The software products are Myriad Group’s Browser, messaging client and Jbed and Nuance’s T9/XT9, eZiText and VSuite.

WebKit on the rise: We estimate that up to the end of 2009 WebKit, the open source browser engine, has been embedded in more than 250 million devices. WebKit owes most of its market penetration to Nokia (Symbian shipments with the Series 40 contribution picking up), while its recent adoption by RIM can only accelerate its market penetration.

Top revenue models: In this edition, we asked the 100 Million Club members to provide us with the top two revenue models for their products. The responses revealed that the most common revenue models for embedded software are per-unit royalties,followed by NRE (non-recurring engineering fees) for product integration or customisation. Despite the tight profit margins, handset OEMs and network operators are still paying for software on a per-unit basis, with the ‘paradigm shift’ to per-active user revenue models taking longer than most would have expected.

What’s in stock for the 100 Million Club
Our watchlist continues to grow, as more products make it past 100 million shipments. Blackberry should be entering the Club in the next edition (H1 2010), with OSX, Windows Mobile and the much younger Android lagging a further 6-18 months behind.

The bigger picture of mobile software is very different than the industry hype would have us think.

– Matos